Winter Vegetable Fried Rice

Growing up, my parents always stressed the importance of eating vegetables. We had at least one fruit or vegetable at every meal and it wasn’t an option not to eat them. And like most children, I didn’t want to eat my vegetables. Kale and arugula were too bitter, and I hated organic broccoli because I loathed the thought of eating aphids. I would play with my food or try to feed it to my dog, probably crying inside because my family would never condone slathering my broccoli  in cheese or bribing me with extra dessert. (J was forced to eat vegetables plain too. Such cruelty.) And then one day I started to like dark leafy greens. And now I won’t cook a meal unless there is green alongside the plate. Funny how things change and we grow up. I bet I wouldn’t eat salad now if I hadn’t had it at meals as a child. Which brings us to this recipe, which is a mix between leafy greens and fried unhealthy goodness.

A friend posted this link to ginger fried rice a few weeks ago. I took one look at the recipe and knew I had to make it as both J and I love fried rice (and leeks, although we are not always Bittman fans). The picture on the blog looked amazing, but it was missing something green. When I planned my meals this week, I had intended to pair this dish with a side of wilted arugula from the garden. But then I got sick, and lazy, and decided to throw vegetables I had on hand in the fridge in instead. Then I added some extra spices because it isn’t fried rice without Chinese Five Spice and Sriracha.

Winter Vegetable Fried Rice

adapted from Smitten Kitchen and Mark Bittman.

  • 4 cups cooked jasmine rice (chilled in the fridge overnight)
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tbps canola oil (plus more for frying eggs)
  • 2 tbsp minced garlic
  • 2 tbsp minced ginger
  • 2 tsp five spice
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 leeks (though green bits removed, patted dry, and cut into thin slices)
  • 2 cups chopped cabbage (patted dry)
  • 2 cups dino kale (washed, patted dry, deveined, and sliced into thin ribbons)
  • 2 cups chopped shitake mushrooms
  • 4 tbsp chopped cilantro
  • 4 eggs
  • 4 tbsp soy sauce
  • sriracha

In a wok over medium, heat 1/4 cup canola oil. Add ginger and garlic and saute until golden brown and crispy. Transfer garlic and ginger to a paper towel, leaving oil in pan.

Turn heat to high. The original recipe suggests you turn heat down, but I think you’ll find that all the vegetables adds a considerable amount of water you’ll want to cook off. I also reduced the amount of oil because it was not necessary in my wok. Add remaining tbsp of oil, five spice, salt, black pepper, leeks, cabbage, kale, and mushrooms. This will look like a lot, but it will all cook down. Saute, stirring often, until vegetables are softened and liquid has evaporated (~8-10 minutes).

Add rice and cook until rice is warm and coated in oil. Remove from heat but keep warm.

Fry eggs however you like. I did it in a nonstick skillet with 1/2 tbsp of canola oil.

Put fried rice in warmed bowls. Top with 1 tbsp cilantro, 1 tbsp soy sauce, and fried egg. Sprinkle fried ginger and garlic over egg and drizzle with sriracha.

My photography skills (or lack there of) may not be on par with these other blogs, but I think my adaptation is pretty tasty. This meal is a nice mix of protein, carbs, and vegetables (and oil, which is good for the skin or something). Oh and it is vegetarian.

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About cookingcampus

I'm a graduate student trying to stay happy and busy and pursue the things I love.
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